Fabulous Classical Cars Housed in Film and Television Museums

Several of the cars that have been used as the central character of a film or television show have already found their way into museums across the nation. Many of these gas-powered inventions have been so loved by visionary writers that they were even given names that identified them as special vehicles with extraordinary powers. The most famous fictional cars to appear in pop culture are Herbie, Kit, Gladys, Eleanor, and the Batmobile.

Herbie of “The Love Bug”

Herbie was one of the first racers to come from the magic of film. As he raced to fame, Herbie could do wheelies, outrun the fastest sports cars, and help his driver find love. Awkwardly, the love he finds is the girlfriend of his racing buddy. Herbie appeared in several film and television spinoffs from the late 1960s through the early 2000s.

Kitt of “Knight Rider”

Kitt was a marvelous machine equipped with the most advanced computer gadgets envisioned by the television industry. He was a sleek black car driven by Michael Knight and bound for heroic feats and derring-do. Together, the duo saved women, foiled bank robbers, and stopped a disaster that would have certainly ended the world. Kitt’s on-board talking computer was famous for keeping Michael Knight in check. There was a very human quality about Kitt that rang true with his television audience.

Gladys of “My Mother the Car”

Kitt was not the first talking car to visit homes through television. Many years ago, for a short period of time, Gladys was an older vehicle inhabited by the spirit of the dead mother of Jerry Van Dyke. Any one of the many automobile museums would have been far happier to have her grace their showrooms than her son was to have her parked in his garage. The car constantly argued with her son throughout the show’s short run on television.

Eleanor of “Gone in 60 Seconds”

From the jaunty jalopies that ushered in an era of fast cars to the daring young men that drove them, cars and their drivers have been the objects of legends as they sped their way to success in the film world. Eleanor ranks high within the muscle class category of collector’s prizes. She’s a beauty with a sleek frame and powerful engine. Before Nicholas Cage stole the iconic beauty in the movie “Gone in 60 Seconds,” H.B. Halicki stole a different model with the same name in the 1974 original film.

The Batmobile

This role has been performed by numerous cars in movies and on television. The original Batmobile has resurfaced every now and then in the news, and people have speculated on its whereabouts for decades. Many car aficionados have sought it out for their own collections, but for now it rotates between multiple automobile museums. It’s not a particularly attractive car, and its speed is questionable, but it holds a nostalgic place in the hearts of television viewers who first saw the caped crusader drive it in the 1960s.

Whether it’s muscle cars or luxury sedans that catch your interest, great cars are on display all across the nation in automobile museums.

Vintage Project Cars For Sale – Repairing Old Cars As a Hobby!

Vintage project cars are old cars that people buy to use in their car repair hobby. Usually, we are talking about cars from the fifties, sixties and the seventies. Cars prior to the fifties are very hard to find. Their parts broke much easier than car parts of later decades. For this reason, there are hardly any of those parts to be found. And that’s why cars much older than the fifties are almost extinct. Sometimes, people will also refer to eighties and nineties cars as ‘vintage’. Whether these cars are vintage or not, is up to you to decide. The most important is that these cars can very well be used for an automobile repair hobby.

Vintage Project Cars For Sale

When looking for a ‘project car’, you are looking for an automobile that is incomplete. In other words, it’s missing crucial parts that keep the car from running. In some cases, the car will run but it’s missing other elementary parts such as a steering wheel or a console. The great thing about project cars with missing parts, is that they cost much less than when you would’ve bought a complete vintage vehicle. When you buy a vintage car without an engine and you find, purchase and put in the right engine for this car, your total costs will be less than buying the same automobile with the working engine already in it.

This is what makes vintage automobile repair such a great hobby. You can get a lot of satisfaction from gathering all the car parts and then putting them back together again to come up with a drivable car. It’s rewarding to take the vehicle for a spin. But many people also sell their working vintage vehicle for a profit. So not only can you get a lot of joy from this hobby, you can also use it to make a few extra bucks.

In some cases, people enjoy vintage auto repair so much that the whole hobby just gets completely out of hand and they turn it into a real business. If you’re an automobile aficionado and you are looking for an opening in the market, you may want to think about taking this up as a hobby. The great thing about it is that you’re not just another car garage that maintains modern cars. You’ll be creating something exotic and you’ll be obeying your own deadlines and nobody else’s. After all, demand for these vintage muscle cars is so high… car lovers from all over the country will be coming to you with filled out checks in hand!

Qatar Classic Cars, A Classic Love

Classic car lovers in Doha the capital of Qatar are willing to face the bumps to go after their passion. Classic, Antique or some may call vintage cars until very recently appeared to be a territory only the rich royalties and the VIPs are allowed to enter. However, this perception has gradually changed, and now the market holds possibilities for even the enthusiasts that are willing to spare a bit over a hundred-thousand Qatari Riyals the equivalent to twenty-thousands US Dollars. This became possible due to the economic boom the area is witnessing, efficient communications with classic car dealers in Houston, along with the superior supply chain management allowed cars in Houston to be transported at low costs.

It now became possible for a knowledgeable enthusiast, with patience, and time at their disposal to buy classic car in Qatar, or an antique car in Dubai, or even a classic car to be shipped from Houston. It became possible to start the process with the equivalent of three thousand US dollars, or in other words for less than the ca was worth in the seventies or eighties.

This however sometimes holds true, and sometimes does not. For instance, Morris Minors was valued in Dubai and Qatar at about QR 15,000 in the eighties. It is very difficult to sell such a car for QR 10,000 in 2007 according to a car dealer. Cars that were easy on the pocket back in their peaking days are unlikely to hold value over the years. Hence, exceptions always pop up, for instance this fact doesn’t hold true with the iconic mini.

I respect, and always reflect my articles with both mine and the apposing; however I do not see a Qatar classic car dealer’s opinion holding true. He said “The classic car market, if it can be called that, will flourish because people have bought [these cars] for nostalgia and recreation — not for financial gain,” says a dealer in classic cars. “Most people, who have bought a classic car in the last ten years, knew their cars would have seen a rise on the value.” To contradict, According to Classic Car magazine, the US has seen a growth in the market for classic cars, particularly American sports cars of the 1960s and 1970s. Cars, such as Chevrolet Corvettes and Camaros, Ford Thunderbirds and Pontiacs, are said to have doubled in value over the past three years.

As I have been promising throughout the article series dedicated to Qatar classic car, the research journey has not stopped, rather the more research I make, the more I am interested to learn about the differences in tastes and markets. To get up-to-date research results, visit the section I dedicated to Qatar classic cars